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Aug 01

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Summer Safety

POOL SAFETY

  • Never leave a child unattended near water in a pool, tub, bucket or ocean.  There is no substitute for adult supervision.
  • Designate a “Water Watcher” to maintain constant watch over children in the pool during gatherings.
  • Keep a phone at poolside so that you never have to leave the pool to answer the phone, and can call for help if needed.
  • Learn CPR and rescue breathing.
  • If a child is missing, always check the pool first.  Seconds count.

 

BOATING SAFETY

  • Check your boat for all required safety equipment.
  • Consider the size of your boat, the number of passengers and the amount of extra equipment that will be on-board. DON’T OVERLOAD THE BOAT!
  • If you will be in a power boat, check your electrical system and fuel system for gas fumes.
  • Check the weather forecast.
  • File a float plan with a member of your family or friend.

BUG SAFETY

  • Don’t use scented soaps, perfumes or hair sprays on your child.
  • Avoid areas where insects nest or congregate, such as stagnant pools of water, uncovered foods and gardens where flowers are in bloom.
  • Avoid dressing your child in clothing with bright colors or flowery prints.
  • To remove a visible stinger from skin, gently back it out by scraping it with a credit card or your fingernail.
  • Combination sunscreen/insect repellent products should be avoided because sunscreen needs to be reapplied every two hours, but the               insect repellent should not be reapplied.
  • Use insect repellents containing DEET when needed to prevent insect-related diseases. Ticks can transmit Lyme Disease, and mosquitoes       can transmit West Nile Virus and other viruses.
  • The current AAP and CDC recommendation for children older than 2 months of age is to use 10% to 30% DEET. DEET should not be used on     children younger than 2 months of age.
  • As an alternative to DEET, picaridin has become available in the U.S. in concentrations of 5% to10%.

 PLAYGROUND SAFETY

  • The playground should have safety-tested mats or loose-fill materials (shredded rubber, sand, wood chips, or bark) maintained to a depth of       at least 9 inches (6 inches for shredded rubber).
  • Equipment should be carefully maintained.
  • Metal, rubber and plastic products can get very hot in the summer, especially under direct sun.     Make sure slides are cool to prevent                     children’s legs from getting burned.
  •  Do not allow children to play barefoot on the playground.
  • Parents should supervise children on play equipment to make sure they are safe.

CAR SAFETY

  • NEVER LEAVE A CHILD UNATTENDED IN A VEHICLE.  NOT EVEN FOR A MINUTE!
  • IF YOU SEE A CHILD UNATTENDED IN A HOT VEHICLE CALL 9-1-1.
  • Always lock your car and ensure children do not have access to keys or remote entry devices.  IF A CHILD IS MISSING, ALWAYS CHECK THE POOL FIRST, AND THEN THE CAR, INCLUDING THE TRUNK. Teach your children that vehicles are never to be used as a play area.
  • Make “look before you leave” a routine whenever you get out of the car.
  • On a summer day it only takes minutes for your car to reach fatal temperatures inside; cracking the windows has little effect on the temperatures.

Permanent link to this article: http://estillcountyema.net/summer-safety/