Jun 30

Fireworks Safety

The Fourth of July holiday is quickly approaching. With warm weather and family events, the Fourth of July can be a fun time with great memories. But before your family celebrates, make sure everyone knows about fireworks safety.

If not handled properly, fireworks can cause burn and eye injuries in kids and adults. In the recent years, six deaths were linked to fireworks and hospital emergency departments treated 9,300 fireworks injuries.

 The best way to protect your family is not to use any fireworks at home — period.

¬       Attend public fireworks displays, and leave the lighting to the professionals.

¬       Lighting fireworks at home isn’t even legal in many areas, so if you still want to use them, be sure to check with your local police department first. If they’re legal where you live, keep these safety tips in mind:

¬     Kids should never play with fireworks. Things like firecrackers, rockets, and sparklers are just too dangerous. If you give kids sparklers, make sure they keep them outside and away from the face, clothing, and hair. Sparklers can reach 1,800° Fahrenheit (982° Celsius) — hot enough to melt gold.

¬       Buy only legal fireworks (legal fireworks have a label with the manufacturer’s name and directions; illegal ones are unlabeled), and store them in a cool, dry place. Illegal fireworks usually go by the names M-80, M100, blockbuster, or quarterpounder. These explosives were banned in 1966, but still account for many fireworks injuries.

¬       Never try to make your own fireworks.

¬      Always use fireworks outside and have a bucket of water and a hose nearby in case of accidents.

¬       Steer clear of others — fireworks have been known to backfire or shoot off in the wrong direction. Never throw or point fireworks at someone, even in jest.

¬       Don’t hold fireworks in your hand or have any part of your body over them while lighting. Wear some sort of eye protection, and avoid carrying fireworks in your pocket — the friction could set them off.

¬      Point fireworks away from homes, and keep away from brush and leaves and flammable substances. Local fire departments respond to more 50,000 fires caused by fireworks each year.

¬       Light one firework at a time (not in glass or metal containers), and never relight a dud.

¬       Don’t allow kids to pick up pieces of fireworks after an event. Some may still be ignited and can explode at any time.

¬       Soak all fireworks in a bucket of water before throwing them in the trash can.

¬       Think about your pet or nearby animals. Animals have sensitive ears and can be extremely frightened or stressed on the Fourth of July. Keep pets indoors to        reduce the risk that they’ll run loose or get injured.

¬       If a child is injured by fireworks, immediately go to a doctor or hospital. If an eye injury occurs, don’t allow your child to touch or rub it, as this may cause even more damage. Also, don’t flush the eye out with water or attempt to put any ointment on it. Instead, cut out the bottom of a paper cup, place it around the eye, and immediately seek medical attention — your child’s eyesight may depend on it. If it’s a burn, remove clothing from the burned area and run cool, not cold, water over the burn (do not use ice). Call your doctor immediately.

 Fireworks are meant to be enjoyed, but you’ll enjoy them much more knowing your family is safe. Take extra precautions this Fourth of July and your holiday will be a blast!

Permanent link to this article: http://estillcountyema.net/fireworks-safety/

Oct 23

CSEPP Zone Signs

The Estill County Emergency Management Agency (EMA)/ Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) is beginning a CSEPP Zone Sign project. You will begin to notice signs being placed throughout the county by County and State Highway Departments.

We have encouraged residents for years to know what their CSEPP Zone is in case of a chemical emergency at the Blue Grass Army Depot. Should an accident occur at the Depot we will notify residents by their zone on what actions they need to take to keep themselves and their families safe. These signs are just another way for us to educate the community on what zone they are in.

Our hope is that these new signs will help residents know what zones they live, work or visit frequently. Knowing you zone is just part of having a Family Emergency Plan. We encourage everyone to create an Emergency Plan and build a Disaster Kit.

Find us on FB; Estill County EMA/CSEPP, or call us (606) 723-6533.

Permanent link to this article: http://estillcountyema.net/csepp-zone-signs/

Oct 23

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

The Estill County EMA/CSEPP office wants you know that carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States. Such common items as automotive exhaust, home heating systems and obstructed chimneys can produce the colorless, odorless gas.

The gas can also be produced by poorly vented generators, kerosene heaters, gas grills and other items used for cooking and heating when used improperly during the winter months.

1. NEVER run generators indoors. Open a window slightly when using a

kerosene heater.

2. NEVER use charcoal to cook indoors.

3. NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include sleepiness, headaches and

dizziness.

If you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning, ventilate the area and get to a hospital. You can purchase carbon monoxide detectors that work like smoke detectors at most retail and hardware stores.

For more information contact the Estill County EMA/CSEPP office at 723-6533.

Permanent link to this article: http://estillcountyema.net/carbon-monoxide-poisoning/

Oct 23

Home Heating Safety

As we begin to turn the heat up inside our homes we need to remember a few safety tips. We heat our homes in different ways, some of us use gas or propane, others use fireplaces or wood stoves and others use electric. No matter how you heat your home there are a few safety precautions you need to take.

If you use gas or propane you need to know:

How to recognize a natural gas or propane gas leak in your home; if you detect a foul odor in you home or in the service line, leave the area immediately and call your local gas company.

How to recognize a gas pipeline leak; look and listen. Look for dirt blowing into the air, for water bubbling from the ground, for fire coming from the ground, dead or dying vegetation on or near a pipeline right of way in an otherwise green area, or for a dry spot in a moist field. Listen for a roaring, blowing, or hissing sound.

What to do if you suspect a gas pipeline leak; turn off and abandon any motorized equipment, leave the area immediately, warn others to stay away, and from a safe place call local emergency personnel and the pipeline operator.

What NOT TO DO; DO NOT use open flames or bring anything into the area that may spark the gas leak (telephones, flashlights, motor vehicles, electric or battery-operated tools, etc.). DO NOT attempt to operate pipeline valves.

In a natural gas emergency or suspected natural gas emergency call 911 and the gas line company. For a natural gas emergency involving Columbia Gas of Kentucky, call their toll free number 1-800-432-9515. For those residents that use propane gas from Hardy Propane Gas Company call 723-2496.

If you use a fireplace or wood stove you should know:

Have your chimney inspected by a professional prior to the start of every heating season. Creosote, a chemical substance that forms when wood burns, builds up in chimneys and can cause a chimney fire if the chimney is not properly cleaned. Always protect your family and home by using a sturdy screen when burning fires. Remember to burn only wood–never burn paper or pine boughs, which can float out of the chimney and ignite a neighboring home. Never use flammable liquids in a fireplace. For wood stoves, chimney connections and chimney flues should be inspected at the beginning of each heating season and cleaned if necessary. Burn only wood, and be sure the wood stove is placed on an approved stove board to protect the floor from heat and hot coals.

If you use electric or kerosene heaters you should know:

Buy only electric heaters with the Underwriter’s Laboratory (UL) safety listing. Check to make sure it has a thermostat control mechanism, and will switch off automatically if the heater falls over. Heaters are not dryers or tables; don’t dry clothes or store objects on top of your heater. Space heaters need space; keep combustibles at least three feet away from each heater. Always unplug your electric space heater when not in use.

Buy only UL-approved kerosene heaters and check with your local fire department on the legality of kerosene heater use in your community. Never fill your heater with gasoline or camp stove fuel; both flare-up easily. Only use crystal clear K-1 kerosene. Never overfill any portable heater. Use the kerosene heater in a well ventilated room.

Permanent link to this article: http://estillcountyema.net/home-heating-safety/

Aug 01

Lightning Safety

Did You Know?

In the United States there are an estimated twenty-five million lightning flashes every year!1

A spark of lightning can reach 50,000 degrees Fahrenheit and contain 100 million electrical volts!2

These are some pretty staggering numbers and if you are struck by lightning they don’t paint a very pretty picture.  So what is the best way to keep from being struck by this amazing force of nature?  Do your best to stay away from it.

Photo courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Department of Commerce

Photo courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Department of Commerce

Lightning is the number two storm related killer. In Kentucky, more people are killed by lightning in an average year than tornadoes. Although severe thunderstorm warnings are NOT necessarily issued for lightning, you should move to shelter when thunder is heard as lightning can strike 10 to 15 miles away from where rain is falling or where the storm appears to be.

  • If outside, go to a safe shelter immediately, such as inside a sturdy building. A hard top automobile with the windows up can also offer fair protection.
  • If you are boating or swimming, get out of the water immediately and move to a safe shelter away from the water!
  • If you are in a wooded area, seek shelter under a thick growth of relatively small trees.
  • If you feel you hair standing on end, squat with your head between your knees. Do not lie flat!
  • Avoid: Isolated trees or other tall objects, bodies of water, sheds, fences, convertible automobiles, tractors, and motorcycles.
  • If inside, avoid using the telephone (except for emergencies) or other electrical appliances.
  • Do not take a bath or shower during a thunderstorm.

Keep these safety tips in mind and stay away from the potentially deadly effects of lightning strikes.  Visit the National Weather Service’s Website for more on lightning safety and the science of lightning.

1 “Lightning Science.” National Weather Service Lightning Safety <http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/science.htm>

2 “Lightning Science.” National Weather Service Lightning Safety <http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/science.htm>

Permanent link to this article: http://estillcountyema.net/lightning-safety/

Aug 01

Summer Safety

POOL SAFETY

  • Never leave a child unattended near water in a pool, tub, bucket or ocean.  There is no substitute for adult supervision.
  • Designate a “Water Watcher” to maintain constant watch over children in the pool during gatherings.
  • Keep a phone at poolside so that you never have to leave the pool to answer the phone, and can call for help if needed.
  • Learn CPR and rescue breathing.
  • If a child is missing, always check the pool first.  Seconds count.

 

BOATING SAFETY

  • Check your boat for all required safety equipment.
  • Consider the size of your boat, the number of passengers and the amount of extra equipment that will be on-board. DON’T OVERLOAD THE BOAT!
  • If you will be in a power boat, check your electrical system and fuel system for gas fumes.
  • Check the weather forecast.
  • File a float plan with a member of your family or friend.

BUG SAFETY

  • Don’t use scented soaps, perfumes or hair sprays on your child.
  • Avoid areas where insects nest or congregate, such as stagnant pools of water, uncovered foods and gardens where flowers are in bloom.
  • Avoid dressing your child in clothing with bright colors or flowery prints.
  • To remove a visible stinger from skin, gently back it out by scraping it with a credit card or your fingernail.
  • Combination sunscreen/insect repellent products should be avoided because sunscreen needs to be reapplied every two hours, but the               insect repellent should not be reapplied.
  • Use insect repellents containing DEET when needed to prevent insect-related diseases. Ticks can transmit Lyme Disease, and mosquitoes       can transmit West Nile Virus and other viruses.
  • The current AAP and CDC recommendation for children older than 2 months of age is to use 10% to 30% DEET. DEET should not be used on     children younger than 2 months of age.
  • As an alternative to DEET, picaridin has become available in the U.S. in concentrations of 5% to10%.

 PLAYGROUND SAFETY

  • The playground should have safety-tested mats or loose-fill materials (shredded rubber, sand, wood chips, or bark) maintained to a depth of       at least 9 inches (6 inches for shredded rubber).
  • Equipment should be carefully maintained.
  • Metal, rubber and plastic products can get very hot in the summer, especially under direct sun.     Make sure slides are cool to prevent                     children’s legs from getting burned.
  •  Do not allow children to play barefoot on the playground.
  • Parents should supervise children on play equipment to make sure they are safe.

CAR SAFETY

  • NEVER LEAVE A CHILD UNATTENDED IN A VEHICLE.  NOT EVEN FOR A MINUTE!
  • IF YOU SEE A CHILD UNATTENDED IN A HOT VEHICLE CALL 9-1-1.
  • Always lock your car and ensure children do not have access to keys or remote entry devices.  IF A CHILD IS MISSING, ALWAYS CHECK THE POOL FIRST, AND THEN THE CAR, INCLUDING THE TRUNK. Teach your children that vehicles are never to be used as a play area.
  • Make “look before you leave” a routine whenever you get out of the car.
  • On a summer day it only takes minutes for your car to reach fatal temperatures inside; cracking the windows has little effect on the temperatures.

Permanent link to this article: http://estillcountyema.net/summer-safety/

Aug 01

Estill County CSEPP Zone Map To Help with Rock Hunting

The Estill County CSEPP zone map. Click on a zone to see more information.

Permanent link to this article: http://estillcountyema.net/estill-county-csepp-zone-map/

Aug 01

Back To School Safety

          Schools in Estill County will open soon and the Estill Emergency Management would like to give a few safety tips to help make the school year a little easier for everyone. 

BACKPACK SAFETY

  • Choose a backpack with wide, padded shoulder straps and a padded back.
  • Pack light. Organize the backpack to use all of its compartments. Pack heavier items closest to the center of   the back. The backpack should never weigh more than 10 to 20 percent of the student’s body weight.
  • Always use both shoulder straps. Slinging a backpack over one shoulder can strain muscles.

 

TRAVELING TO AND FROM SCHOOL

Review the basic rules with your youngster: 

School Bus

  • Wait for the bus to stop before approaching it from the curb.
  •  Do not move around on the bus.
  • Check to see that no other traffic is coming before crossing.
  •  Make sure to always remain in clear view of the bus driver.

Car

  • All passengers should wear a seat belt and/or an age- and size-appropriate car safety seat or booster seat.
  • Your child should ride in a car safety seat with a harness as long as possible and then ride in a belt-positioning booster seat. Your child is ready for a booster seat when she has reached the top weight or height allowed for her seat, her shoulders are above the top harness slots, or her ears have reached the top of the seat.
  • Your child should ride in a belt-positioning booster seat until the vehicle’s seat belt fits properly (usually when the child reaches about 4′ 9″ in height and is between 8 to 12 years of age). This means the shoulder belt lies across the middle of the chest and shoulder, not the neck or throat; the lap belt is low and snug across the thighs, not the stomach; and the child is tall enough to sit against the vehicle seat back with her legs bent at the knees and feet hanging down.
  • All children under 13 years of age should ride in the rear seat of vehicles. If you must drive more children than can fit in the rear seat (when carpooling, for example), move the front-seat passenger’s seat as far back as possible and have the child ride in a booster seat if the seat belts do not fit properly without it.
  • Remember that many crashes occur while novice teen drivers are going to and from school. You should limit the number of teen passengers to prevent driver distraction; this is even required by law in many states. Do not allow your teen to drive while eating, drinking, or talking on a cell phone.

Walking to School

  • Make sure your child’s walk to a school is a safe route with well-trained adult crossing guards at every intersection.
  • Be realistic about your child’s pedestrian skills. Because small children are impulsive and less cautious around traffic, carefully consider whether or not your child is ready to walk to school without adult supervision.
  • Bright colored clothing will make your child more visible to drivers.

 

BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL CHILD CARE

  • During middle childhood, youngsters need supervision. A responsible adult should be available to get them ready and off to school in the morning and watch over them after school until you return home from work.
  • Children approaching adolescence (11- and 12-year-olds) should not come home to an empty house in the afternoon unless they show unusual maturity for their age.
  • If alternate adult supervision is not available, parents should make special efforts to supervise their children from a distance. Children should have a set time when they are expected to arrive at home and should check in with a neighbor or with a parent by telephone.
  • If you choose a commercial after-school program, inquire about the training of the staff. There should be a high staff-to-child ratio, and the rooms and the playground should be safe.

Permanent link to this article: http://estillcountyema.net/back-to-school-safety/

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SBA Disaster Loans

Permanent link to this article: http://estillcountyema.net/728-2/

Mar 09

March 9 Storm Update

**Volunteers**
If you want to volunteer with a clean-up crew please register at the Estill County Fair Barn between 9:30am and 2pm to be assigned to a crew. The weather will be decent the next few days and we need to get as much done as possible.

The Donation Drop Off Center is located at Main St. in Ravenna at the Helping Hands Outreach.
**Days and hours of operation will be today and Friday 11am-1pm and 5pm-7pm**
We also need grocery cards so people can buy refrigerated food. We do not need any more water or clothing.**
Cleaning items we are running low on:
Mops, brooms, buckets, laundry detergent, dish soap, and window cleaner.

Clean-up teams will be out assisting residents with debris removal. If you have already started clean-up move debris to the curb and they will get picked-up. If you need assistance with debris removal please call our office at 723-6533 or message us on fb so we can send a crew to you.

Thank you to everyone who is continuing to help our community recover from this disaster.

We continue to receive reports of damaged homes.
*201 homes damaged – 21 destroyed
We ask that any Estill County resident that has damage to their property to please contact our office (723-6533) and let us know. We need to document everything, it doesn’t matter how minor.

Permanent link to this article: http://estillcountyema.net/march-9-storm-update/

Mar 07

Storm Damage March 7, 2017

March 7, 2017 7:30am

We continue to receive reports of damaged homes.

We ask that any Estill County resident that has damage to their property to please contact our office (723-6533) and let us know. We need to document everything, it doesn’t matter how minor.

The Donation Drop Off Center is located at Main St. in Ravenna at the Helping Hands Outreach.

**Days and hours of operation will be Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 11am-1pm and 5pm-7pm**

*We are in need of disposable plates, bowls, cups, forks and spoons. Totes and tarps. We also need grocery cards so people can buy refrigerated food. We do not need any more water or clothing.**

Cleaning items we are running low on:

Mops, brooms, buckets, laundry detergent, dish soap, and window cleaner.

Clean-up teams will be out assisting residents with debris removal. If you have already started clean-up move debris to the curb and they will get picked-up. If you need assistance with debris removal please call our office at 723-6533 or message us on fb so we can send a crew to you.

**Volunteers**

If you want to volunteer with a clean-up crew please register at the Estill County Fair Barn between 9:30am and 2pm to be assigned to a crew.

Permanent link to this article: http://estillcountyema.net/storm-damage-march-7-2017/

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